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Industrial Training
(Saturday, Dec 16. 2017 06:19 AM)
I admire what you have done here. I like the part where you say you are doing this to give back but I would assume by all the comments that this is working for you as well.

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History of Medical Experimentation in the U.S.

“For forty years between 1932 and 1972, the U.S. Public Health Service (PHS) conducted an experiment on 399 black men in the late stages of syphilis. These men, for the most part illiterate sharecroppers from one of the poorest counties in Alabama, were never told what disease they were suffering from or of its seriousness. Informed that they were being treated for “bad blood,” their doctors had no intention of curing them of syphilis at all. The data for the experiment was to be collected from autopsies of the men, and they were thus deliberately left to degenerate under the ravages of tertiary syphilis—which can include tumors, heart disease, paralysis, blindness, insanity, and death. “As I see it,” one of the doctors involved explained, “we have no further interest in these patients until they die.”This program, hosted by CBS News correspondent Richard Schlesinger, includes an interview with one of the last surviving participants, Herman Shaw; explains the role of Nurse Rivers; and presents the medical establishment’s justification for disguising racism as legitimate medical research.”

A nearly extinct relic, The Deadly Deception was once a documentary screened in high schools throughout the US. It may be still, although its net presence is not consistent with that of an important educational film.

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